Photoshop Tutorial: Creating Grunge & Texture Recipes

I have a confession to make:

Do you know what my biggest difficulty in editing used to be?

Consistency!

I was all over the place with my editing. In fact I could have probably won an award for “Most Photoshop Actions & Lightroom Presets Used.”

Unfortunately for both me and my portrait clients, that meant that my style was never cohesive AND it took me forever to edit a session.

Seriously, I would start form scratch every single time I started a new image, like I was reinventing the wheel.

Plus I had no signature “look.” No one would have looked at my work and said “Ah, that looks like Jen Kiaba took that photograph.”

And that’s what we all want, right?

Having our work recognized as uniquely ours is what brings us clients and artistic recognition.

Whether it’s a wedding client or a gallery looking at your portfolio, you Need to Have Consistency!

So when I first sat down to begin my newest body of work, I literally wrote down all of the steps that I took to create the image.

Almost a year and half later I am still using that same Photoshop grunge texture recipe.

Say What?? A Recipe?

Yup. I have an actual Photoshop Texture recipe that I will be sharing in an upcoming tutorial.

But for now I’m going to teach you how to create your very own texture recipe using the textures I offer in my shop, plus a peek at the texture recipe that I’ve been using the last 18 months or so.

In this Photoshop tutorial I show you how to create your own Grunge or Texture recipe that you can refer to again and again in your editing process.

The benefits of this are two fold: you save time in your editing workflow and you begin to develop a consistency in your work which helps to form your overall artistic voice!

To grab the sample texture pack that I’m working with, sign up for my newsletter at the end of this post!

In the meantime watch the tutorial:

 

I hope that this tip help you save a ton of time, AND helps you communicate a consistent style to your clients.

If you have any questions about the tutorial, feel free to pop into my Facebook Group Beneath the Surface, Beneath the Surface, and ask. Either I, or one of our awesome members, will be able to answer your question!

Photoshop Tutorial Graphic for Removing Textures with Layer Masks and Custom Healing Brushes

Photoshop Tutorial: Removing Textures Using Photoshop Layer Masks & Custom Healing Brushes

As promised, here is Part Two of my “Using Textures to Enhance Your Portrait and Fine Art” tutorial series!

If you missed Part One, check it out here: Photoshop Tutorial: Using Textures to Enhance Your Portraits and Fine Art.

One of my biggest pet peeves when I began using textures was that I didn’t always want to see the texture on the skin. There are times where it definitely enhances the image: think of cracks overlaid on skin and what a cool effect it could make.

A blindfolded woman in white sits in a red boat, that floats in black water, surrounded by fog.

A blindfolded woman in white sits in a red boat, that floats in black water, surrounded by fog.

But there are other times, say with a bridal portrait, where the texture doesn’t exactly make it look like the bride has the greatest skin.

When I began creating my most recent series, “Burdens of a White Dress,” it was really important to me to be specific about how and where the textures were applied.

For the most part I only wanted the texture to be applied to the background.

In this video I show you a couple of different ways you can achieve that result.

The first way is to use Layer Masks. This method can work great if your textures aren’t changing the overall exposure of your image. But if you have multiple textures on various blending mode, especially soft light, multiply or overlay, you’ll likely end up having a few textures that are effecting the brightness or contrast of your photograph.

So, in order to remove textures without affecting exposure I like to use a custom healing brush.

Take a watch and see how I use both methods, and how to create that custom brush:

If you’d like to get more of the tutorial videos in this series delivered straight to your inbox, along with the free Photoshop Grunge Textures that I use, click here to sign up for my newsletter.

As always, take a watch and let me know if you have any questions.

The next video will be talking about how to create Texture Recipes that you can use over and over again on your images to create consistency within a series.

So stay tuned and happy creating!

An example of the kind of painterly look that you can achieve using textures in Photoshop

Photoshop Tutorial: Using Textures in Portraits & Fine Art

It’s time for a quick & easy Photoshop Texture Tutorial!

Ever wondered how photographers get that gorgeous vintage or painterly effect on their images?

The secret is by applying textures in Photoshop.

Check out my photoshop tutorial on how you can achieve kind a painterly look that you can achieve using textures.

An example of the kind of painterly look that you can achieve using textures in Photoshop

If you follow me on Facebook, you know that I’ve had a Photoshop Texture Tutorial in the works for a bit to accompany the free Photoshop grunge textures that I’m gifting (grab them here!). 

And, as promised, I’ve created the tutorial, especially for those who are wondering how to incorporate textures into the portrait and fine art workflow. It ended up being pretty long, so I’ve broken it up into bite-sized chunks.

You know, for easy digestion and what have ya.

This savory morsel kicks things off with some basics. If you’ve never used textures before, then this is for you!

I show you how to apply textures, change their blending mode, change the opacity, how to remove the color cast that they can create, and how to apply multiple textures to an image.

The next video will be talking about a couple of different ways that you can edit your textures so that they don’t show up subject’s skin.

If you’d like to get the rest of the videos in this series delivered straight to your inbox, along with the free Photoshop Grunge Textures that I use, click here.

I’ll be back again soon with Part Two of this tutorial! Until then, happy creating!

 

A topless woman in a white tutu holds her arms tight against herself as an angry red wound in her back begins to heal.

Photoshop Tutorial: Using Textures in Portraits & Fine Art

It’s time for a quick & easy Photoshop Tutorial!

Ever wondered how photographers get a painterly effect on their images?

Check out my photoshop tutorial on how you can achieve kind a painterly look that you can achieve using textures.

An example of the kind of painterly look that you can achieve using textures in Photoshop

One of the most effective ways is by incorporating textures into their photographs using a software program like Photoshop.

If you follow me on Facebook, you know that I’ve had a Photoshop Tutorial in the works for a bit to accompany the free Photoshop grunge textures that I’m gifting (grab them here!). 

And, as promised, I’ve created the tutorial, especially for those who are wondering how to incorporate textures into the portrait and fine art workflow. It ended up being pretty long, so I’ve broken it up into bite-sized chunks.

You know, for easy digestion and what have ya.

This savory morsel kicks things off with some basics. If you’ve never used textures before, then this is for you!

I show you how to apply textures, change their blending mode, change the opacity, how to remove the color cast that they can create, and how to apply multiple textures to an image.

The next video will be talking about a couple of different ways that you can edit your textures so that they don’t show up subject’s skin.

If you’d like to get the rest of the videos in this series delivered straight to your inbox, along with the free Photoshop Grunge Textures that I use, click here.

I’ll be back again soon with Part Two of this tutorial! Until then, happy creating!